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20131202
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operation since apardth d apartheid. it raised questions about the country's leadership and power of the anc which was once unquestionably a party of the peel. with more, mike hanna in johan he johanesbur g. >> prayers for a man who touched the lives of all. an awarenets of challenges to come. the growing death between rich and poor is the most brutal reminder that mandela's promise of a better life is still to be realized. >> i think the challenge we have doesn't necessarily need man dela. it needs us in south africa to face the reality if we don't do something very logical, the why unpeople are going to revolt because if they remain poor, and a few become richer, the young people will revolt. if the fault lines within south african society have been too clear in recent times, a labor dispute that resulted in the killing of more than 30 americana last year. many argue the root cause of such violence is an africans national congress government that has lost touch with those who put it in power. >> if you look at what has been happening over the last few years in terms of public violence, you
was a loyal member of the anc as he said. part of his virtue as a politician was that he changed and bended. the anc said, national of the minds, he believed that, he changed his mind. but what he always believed and never forgot and it's a little bit unpopular to say he believed politics was way of changing people's lives for the better. and he was proud to call himself a politics that is what he did. >> as politics you also understood dramatic flourish. there were moments, we saw that in 1990 when he did that eight-city tour. i think when he went to detroit he quoted marvin gay. in front of that audience, it was brilliant. mother, mother, too many of -- brother, brother, too many of you are dying, mother, mother, too many are crying. he understood the moment. >> schieffer: what did he say in new york? >> can i just tell a story. when we were doing christmas kindness in south africa go to remote villages. thousands of kids would be waiting for their soccer balls and jersey. a local politician went on for an hour about political theory. nelson mandela did twinkle, twinkle, little star and
, which was always the goal of the anc. and whether one is from nigeria or tanzania or closer to home, mozambique, across africa people rallied behind the anc in that struggle. i think president mandela stood for freedom, and he now stands for integrity and perseverance. the continent needs to move towards that in terms of the next phase of the struggle, which is political freedom has been achieved now. economic freedom is necessary. >> speak a little about your own experience in relation to the perspective of nelson mandela, particularly when it comes to nonviolent protest, and in violence in africa, as well is the work you have done combating aids in africa. >> i really respect president mandela, again, because of his conviction. he was a person who started as he did, in terms of nonviolent struggle against apartheid regime, and at some point he realized the level of repression of the national party required a more robust response, which was moving towards arms struggle. leader likefound a erk who could negotiate with the national party that was now ready after the mass demonstratio
in the anc, the african national congress which until the so-called massacre had advocated only peaceful protests. >> there are many people who feel that it is useful for us to continue talking nonviolence against the government. on defenseless people. >> mandela was one of those people he founded the armed wing of anc. considered a revolutionary he was put on trial for sabotage and conspiracy, his defense was a defiant four and a half hour speech that ended this way. >> i have fought against and i have fought against. >> the ideal of democratic and free society he went on. >> for which i am prepared to die. >> he expect to be hanged instead he was sentenced to life in prison. but even locked up nelson mandela was considered a terrorist by the south african government. you could be jailed for wearing a t-shirt like this one or carrying a sign. >> we demand the unconditional release of nelson mandela! >> international pressure to end apartheid and free nelson mandela was incensed. the star studded rock concert held in london in honor of his 70th birthday was seen on television by hundreds
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4